Social Studies Courses

Supervisor:Rebecca Lucas 908-284-7147, rlucas@hcrhs.org

The rigor of a student’s academic schedule and the grades received are key aspects considered by college admissions officers. Please note: Prerequisite requirements for required and elective courses are listed in the course descriptions. Please read these carefully, to ensure that all prerequisite courses have been taken before selecting a course. While we encourage students to challenge themselves in their course selection, the demands of higher level courses can be significant. If you are considering a change in level, talk to your current teacher and counselor for guidance.

2018-2019 Social Studies Course Descriptions:

FRESHMAN REQUIREMENTS:

Freshman are required to take either #101 United States History, 100 Honors United States History 1, 109 Academic Assistance United States History 1, or #111 Big History.

# 111- BIG HISTORY- 5 CREDITS
Grade: 9

Big History will satisfy the NJ World History Requirement for those freshmen who take the course. This is the first course in a three year required course sequence in Social Studies. Students taking Big History will take United States History I their sophomore year and United States History II their junior year. This course explores the modern scientific origin story of how the universe and life within it has grown more complex over the last 13.7 billion years. Together, students will engage powerful ideas and common themes across the entire time scale of history, from the Big Bang and creation of star systems to the emergence of the Earth’s first microorganisms and the recent rise of human societies. Big History is designed to give students the relevant, applicable information they need to be informed and productive global citizens. Skills such as research, writing, and communication will be a focus as students answer history’s greatest questions.


#101 - UNITED STATES HISTORY I - 5 CREDITS
Grade: 9

This course is the first in a three year required course sequence in Social Studies. A chronological/topical survey of United States history from the Sectionalism (1844) to America on the World Stage (1929) is studied, with an emphasis on literacy and historical thinking skills. U.S. History I is taught within a global framework, with historical comparisons in different time periods receiving special emphasis. This course prepares students for the remaining courses in the social studies program, trains students for active citizenship in our society, and prepares students for in-depth study of social studies electives in the junior and senior years.


#109 - UNITED STATES HISTORY I - Academic Assistance - 5 CREDITS
Grade: 9

This course has the same objectives and proficiencies as #101 but is a developmental course intended for students who need instruction at a level to help them gain skills necessary for standards based assessments. Students are placed into this course based upon review of their standardized test performance on the PARCC, as well as other information provided by middle school faculty.


#100 - HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY I – 5 CREDITS
Grade: 9

U.S. History I Honors is an intensive course that provides a chronological/thematic study of the period from 1844 to 1929. Students will spend time analyzing primary sources, applying historical thinking skills and creating historical comparisons of different eras. Students will complete extensive historical reading and writing assignments with an emphasis on historical inquiry.

SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS:

Sophomores are required to choose either #122 United States History II, #125 Academic Assistance United States History II, #160 Advanced Placement United States History


#122 - UNITED STATES HISTORY II– 5 CREDITS
Grade: 10
Prerequisite- United States History I

This is the second in a three year required sequence in social studies. A chronological/topical survey of U.S. History Economic Crisis/World War II (1929) to the present is studied. U.S. History II is taught within a global framework, with historical comparisons in different time periods receiving special emphasis. U.S. History 2 continues and refines the development of literacy and historical thinking skills, behaviors, and knowledge taught in U.S. History I. It builds upon the citizenship focus begun in U.S. History 1, and prepares students for in-depth study of social studies electives in the junior and senior years.


#125 - UNITED STATES HISTORY- II, Academic Assistance – 5 CREDITS
Grade: 10
Prerequisite: United States History I

This course has the same objectives and proficiencies as #122, but is a developmental course intended for students who need instruction at a level to help them pass standards based assessments. Students are placed into this course based upon teacher recommendations and prior performance in U.S. History I #109 or related academic assistance courses.


#160 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: #100 Honors United States History I or #101 United States History I

This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Examination in United States History offered by the College Board. This college level course provides a chronological/thematic study of United States History from 1914 to the present, emphasizing critical reading, research, oral participation and analytical writing skills. This course addresses 2016 NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards, as well as the New Jersey Student Learning Standards and College Board requirements. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply.


JUNIOR REQUIREMENTS:

All juniors are required to take one of the following, #127 Global Studies, #129 Global Studies Academic Assistance, #034 Honors Humanities or #162 AP World or #122 US II (if following the Big History pathway)


#127 - GLOBAL STUDIES - 5 CREDITS
Grade: 11
Prerequisite: United States History I and United States History II

This is the capstone course in the three year required sequence in social studies. Global Studies builds upon the skills, behaviors, and knowledge taught in United States History I and II. Five themes of analysis will be emphasized throughout the Global Studies sequence; Governance, Security, and Human Rights; Geography and the Environment; Economics, Innovation, and Technology; Culture; and Global Citizenship. Global Studies explores world history topics from 1400 through the present.


#129 – GLOBAL STUDIES, Academic Assistance - 5 CREDITS
Grade: 11
Prerequisite: United States History I and United States History II

This course has the same objectives and proficiencies as #127 but is a developmental course intended for students who need instruction at a level to help them pass standards based assessments. Students are placed into this course based upon teacher recommendations and prior performance in United States History II #125 or related academic assistance courses.


#034 - HONORS HUMANITIES - 10 CREDITS
Grade: 11
Prerequisite: #021 Honors English 2 or #022 English 2 and #160 Advanced Placement United States History, or #122 History II

Honors Humanities is a year-long course that meets both English and social studies requirements. Students who opt to take this course will be working toward meeting the curriculum proficiencies for Honors Expository Writing, World Literature and Global Studies by engaging in a curriculum that integrates the three areas using a humanities approach. This course is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of diverse world cultures, human rights, and global security through the study of works of literature, non-fiction, newspapers, periodicals, electronic media, film, music and art. Using a multi-text approach, students will critically examine a variety of perspectives that they will use to inform their own ideas, beliefs and values. Based on their reading, discussion, research, and analysis, students will generate writings that emphasize an array of rhetorical modes and will participate in multiple service learning projects.Students receive 5 Honors Social Studies credits and 5 Honors English credits.


#162 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of 10 credits of United States History

AP World History explores the history of the world from a truly global stance rather than from the dominant perspective of Western civilization. This approach therefore places emphasis on worldwide historical processes and connections among the whole gamut of human societies. In order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of these events, students need both factual knowledge and the ability to critically assess such information. This course helps students on both fronts, teaching the historical facts in the context of how progressive changes – environmental, social, scientific, and political – influenced the various societies they touched, as well as how these groups interacted with each other. Students are exposed to many primary sources in an effort to show them how historical works and how they can proceed to make their own informed interpretations of world events, both past and present. Significantly, the course is organized by five defining time periods. This is a content and skill intensive course and students are expected to invest the appropriate amount of time. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply. Students who drop the course and still need to satisfy their World History requirement will need to take Global Studies the following year. This course may be taken as an elective or to satisfy the World History graduation requirement.


#132 ECONOMICS - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Completion of 5 credits in United States History
Note: This course meets the Financial Literacy Graduation Requirement

This course introduces students to the study of economics and principles of financial investment. Fundamental micro-economic principles of scarcity, opportunity costs, comparative advantage, supply and demand, elasticity, and price controls are discussed. Macroeconomic principles include issues of national output, unemployment, inflation, and the Federal Reserve’s use of monetary policy for stabilization of the economy. The personal finance component includes an ongoing study of the securities market through the use of an online stock simulation.


#143 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS - 5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of 10 credits in United States History
Recommendation: It is strongly recommended that students have an average of 88 or above computed from the final grades in U.S. History 1 and 2 or a final average of 85 in AP United States History. Further, students are recommended to have earned a final average of 85 in Algebra 1.
Note: This course meets the Financial Literacy Graduation Requirement for students.

This course is intended for students seeking an in-depth background in micro-economic and macroeconomic principles. It prepares students for the AP Microeconomics exam and AP Macroeconomics exam. Basic concepts discussed include scarcity, opportunity costs, specialization and comparative advantage. Micro-economic concepts include supply and demand; consumer theory; the theory of the firm under perfect competition, monopoly and other market structures; factor markets; and market failure. Macro-economic principles discussed include measurements of economic performance such as gross domestic product, inflation and unemployment; national income, aggregate supply and demand analysis, Classical and Keynesian viewpoints, monetary and fiscal policy; and international economics and growth as well as topics related to exchange rates and balance of payments. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply.


#110 - INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 9-12

This course focuses on the practical applications of geographic information systems (GIS) and the five fundamental geographic themes (location, place, human-environment interactions, movement, and region). Each theme is examined and introduced, and then applied to various world areas including Africa, Latin America, Asia and North America.


#133 - THE CLASSICAL WORLD – 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12

This history course provides a comprehensive examination of the development of ancient Near Eastern (including Sumer, Judea, Assyria, and Persia), Egyptian, Greek and Roman civilizations. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the ancient Mediterranean world beginning with ancient Near East and ancient Egypt, continuing through ancient Greece and Rome and concluding with Muslim contact with the Byzantine Empire. Themes emphasized include the growth of democracy, imperialism, the expansion of empires, cultural and social influences on modern societies, and causes for the decline of these ancient civilizations. This course is recommended to all students planning to pursue studies in the liberal arts and humanities.


#134 - ANTHROPOLOGY - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

Anthropology is a course for students interested in physical anthropology, which is the study of human origins, and cultural anthropology, which is the study of diverse contemporary cultures. The course analyzes various theories and controversies about evolution and the origin of species, patterns of cultural development and change over time, and the roles which anthropologists have in studying cultures and informing human understanding of daily life. Students become active participants in simulations, experiments, and participant observation studies.


#135 - THE MEDIEVAL WORLD (2.5 CREDITS)
Grades: 10-12

The Medieval World provides students with a window into the Middle Ages in Europe and demonstrates the significance of this time period in the context of both European and global history. Students will identify and develop connections between the Middle Ages and antiquity, early modern history, and the contemporary world. The course commences with the fall of Rome and concludes with the start of the Renaissance, roughly the period 500 through 1350 C.E. Units of study include the rise of kingdoms and nations in Europe, Medieval concepts of gender, social class, and chivalry, The Medieval city and economic developments, art and architecture, Medieval warfare, and the role of religion as a force for unification and division in the Medieval world. The students will explore the content through project-based learning, discussions, simulations, and other student-centered activities. Students will be exposed to the history and culture of the Medieval world through literature, primary texts, art, and film. The course includes a field trip to the Cloisters Museum in New York City.


#136 -INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY-2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 9-12

This introductory course emphasizes the scientific study of behavior and mental processes from diverse perspectives. Topics include psychology as a science, biological bases of behavior, lifespan, stress and health, and social psychology. This course will focus on psychology as a tool for personal development and improvement. Students will be expected to complete a project focused on their own personal development and goals.


#146 - HONORS PSYCHOLOGY- 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12

Honors Psychology emphasizes an intensive study of many key questions that psychologists attempt to answer. The course focuses on topics such as: the effectiveness of psychotherapy, the effects of viewing violent television programs, the consequences of diagnostic labels, the potential benefits and drawbacks of the Internet, and extent to which intelligence is more a result of nature or nurture. The course begins with examination of the major perspectives in psychology and how research methods are used to study phenomena.


#149 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY - 5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

Advanced Placement Psychology is a course offered for students desiring an intensive, in-depth study of major topics in psychology. The course follows the standards set forth by the American Psychological Association for the teaching of psychology in secondary schools and utilizes the learning objectives defined by the CollegeBoard for an AP Psychology curriculum. Students are required to complete written essays; be active participants in classroom discussions, demonstrations and peer consultations/evaluations; complete independent research; and, prepare for comprehensive examinations by developing student-generated review sessions. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply. This course is available for college credit in the FDU Middle College Program.


#137 – INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 9-12

This course incorporates the study of core sociological concepts and sociologists past and present who have influenced the discipline of sociology, as well as the study of sociological trends and issues pertinent to the lives of high school students. A variety of activities and projects, including written analysis are employed to study a variety of social problems currently existing in the United States and other world societies. Topics examined in the course are the processes used by sociologists to study human societies, changing cultural traditions, the creation and maintenance of class structures in the United States, and the development of social movements in U. S. society.


#147 – HONORS SOCIOLOGY - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: #137 Introductory Sociology

This course emphasizes the in-depth study of selected social problems inviting students to explore how social problems are interpreted by various social theorists. Course topics include socialization processes, gender relations, juvenile crime, analysis of social institutions (family, education, work, religion, the mass media and others) and case studies in racial/ethnic relations. A research study is completed by each student that includes collection, interpretation and written analysis of data using methods employed by practicing sociologists. This course contains a community service requirement. This course is available for college credit in the FDU Middle College Program.


#138 - HUMAN RIGHTS AND GENOCIDE AFTER WORLD WAR II – 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

Human rights violations and genocides did not end with the perpetrators of the Holocaust eing brought to justice at the post World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals. This course builds on the introduction to human rights and global security issues studied in #127 or #129 Global Studies, as well as the 20th century genocides examined in both United States History and the the Holocaust and Human Behavior courses. The course addresses essential questions about the contemporary protection of international human rights and the continuing problem of genocide in the world community.


#139 – HONORS INTRO TO WESTERN PHILOSOPHY - 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

This course is a general overview of philosophical traditions beginning with ancient times and continuing to the present. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the study of philosophy and its basic questions, which are relevant to all disciplines. A concentrated reading schedule structured around central questions such as, "What can we know?” “What is right?” and “Why am I here?” will allow students to analyze the writings of major philosophers and their answers to these questions as well as helping students begin to answer these questions for themselves. The course ought to be challenging to students of high academic ability. Philosophy is a course valuable to students planning to major in the humanities, and it provides opportunities to develop critical skills helpful for students entering the fields of law and medicine. This course is available for college credit in the FDU Middle College Program.


#148-HOLOCAUST & HUMAN BEHAVIOR- 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

The Holocaust is one of the turning points in human history, whose critical influence in our lives remains 65 years after the end of World War II. This course builds on the introduction to the Holocaust and genocide studied in US History 2, and addresses essential questions about the Holocaust and its impact on Human behavior. Among these are: the origins of the Holocaust; the role of Anti-Semitism and racism; who were the perpetrators, victims and bystanders; patterns of resistance; the response of the United States and other countries; and universal lessons for today. This course may incorporate a field trip to the U. S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC. Students who enroll in this course and/or successfully complete it are eligible to apply for participation in the school’s Holocaust overseas study program in Poland and the Czech Republic.


#170 - GENDER STUDIES 2.5 CREDITS

Grades: 10-12

This course begins with a survey of basic concepts of feminist theory and the subsequent development of gender theory. Students will assess the definition of femininity and women’s unique participation in the development, operation, and advancement of society. Students will explore the inherent and social constructions of masculinity and how these notions evolve into elastic social norms. The congruence between gender and sexual orientation will be studied. Projects will investigate representations of gender in television and film and their reciprocal impact on society. Students will be taught to critically examine affective legal policy, the impact of social institutions on gender, and the development of gender equality activism. A relevant selection of current topics including race, class, religion, economics, education, sports, and health will be examined through readings and discussions. Students will also compare contemporary manifestations and perceptions of gender in non-Western societies through the context of established gender theory.


#156 - POLITICAL SCIENCE AND CITIZENSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY - 5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12

Political Science and Citizenship in the 21st Century Is a project based learning course for students interested in local, state and national politics, public policy, political parties and campaigns, and the impact of technology on the American political system. It is designed both for students interested in pursuing careers in public service and those that desire to be well-informed and active citizens. The course includes community involvement through student designed projects and direct contact with elected and appointed government workers, as well as interaction with private sector citizens that influence policy. Students meet and question guest speakers throughout the course and attend oral arguments of the Appellate Division of the Superior Court and of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. Students will research political issues unique to citizens of the 21st century. Students will also investigate the role of social media on government and citizenship. Recommended to be taken after AP Government and Politics #165.

#145 - COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGIONS – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 5 credits of United States History.

Comparative World Religions provides a comprehensive examination of global religious traditions and practices and promotes a greater understanding of the role(s) and significance of world religions in contemporary society. The course examines major world religions using both historic and contemporary sources, while preparing students for life in a pluralistic society. The course is divided into five distinct sections: Religious Beginnings, Evolution of the Eastern Traditions, Evolution of the Western Traditions, Religious Ethics and Religious Conflict. Students will use a variety of texts and various forms of electronic media, including primary source materials, to compare these traditions, examine how the traditions have evolved over time, and evaluate their impact on cultural traditions and practices in contemporary societies.


#190 – SUMMER GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP – 2.5 CREDITS


Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completions of 10 credits of United States History

Students who secure a summer governmental internship will meet with the Supervisor of Social Studies to develop a unique service learning plan and contract. The service learning plan and contract will address New Jersey. Core Curriculum Content Standard 6.3 and be tailored to the specific functions that the internship may entail. To receive credit, students must complete 60 hours of service learning, as well as, a written research project and presentation. The course is an Option II: Alternate Path experience. Click on the link for information on enrolling in an Option II course.


#1900 RESEARCH IN ARCHIVES AND LOCAL HISTORY 1.25 CREDITS OR 2.5 CREDITS
By arrangement with the advisor
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Consultation with the Supervisor of Social Studies

This course is open to students with a strong interest in history who wish to pursue guided independent research in the study of archives and local history. Interested students must complete a detailed application which includes a prospectus, outline of work and evaluation plan, along with completing written assignments that address the following topics:
A. History and development of professional archives and how they inform research in local history
B. Structure, function and roles of archives in institutions such as schools, universities, the private sector and government
C. Collection management and development processes
D. Standards for organization and categorization of archival collections
E. Methods for design and completion of finding aids
F. Methods for design and preparation of exhibits

Credits are by arrangement with the Supervisor of Social Studies: 1.25 credits can be earned by successful completion of projects requiring 30 hours of in-school work, while 2.50 credits can be earned by successful completion of summer projects requiring 60 hours work. Actual work plans for each student will be developed jointly with the Supervisor of Social Studies prior to the beginning of the course. The course is an Alternate Credit Pathway experience. Please click on the link for information on enrolling in an Option II Course.


#195 – SOCIAL JUSTICE IN AMERICA – 2.5 CREDITS
Grades: 11-12

Students will examine current events and controversial issues dealing with social justice . Students will explore causes and effects of inequality, privilege, opportunity, and justice. They will begin to unravel the role of race and socioeconomic status in creating and perpetuating social inequities. Students will discuss relevant issues and solutions and work to help raise awareness of these problems in American society and in our community. Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of emerging public policy and grassroots efforts. Guest speakers from various community organizations will be presenting their areas of expertise in order to enhance student understanding of how these issues manifest and are addressed in our community.


#152 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 9-12

This course is an in-depth and intensive study of geographic themes and issues, both historic and contemporary. It prepares students for the advanced placement test in Human Geography. Topics include demography, cultural geography (language, religion, identity and ethnicity), economic geography, political geography, the history of agriculture and the role of agriculture in the global economic system and urban geography. Through these topics students will explore and analyze the intricate and complicated interactions between human beings and their environment. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply.


#165 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: U.S. – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 9 -12

This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States . This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U .S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples . It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U .S. government and politics. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply. Recommended to be taken prior to Political Science and Citizenship in the 21st Century # 156.

#161 - ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY – 5 CREDITS
Grades: 10-12

AP European History comprises a chronological/thematic examination of European History from 1300 to the present day. Some of the major topics of study are the Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, Enlightenment, French Revolution, Industrialization, Nationalism, Marxism/socialism, Imperialism, The Great War, Rise of Dictatorships and the Second World War, Cold War Europe and the Collapse of Communism. The course emphasizes the development of critical reading, oral participation, research and analytical writing skills in preparations for the Advanced Placement Examination in European History. Students enrolled in an AP course are expected to take the AP Exam. In addition, students enrolled in an AP course who take the AP Exam will receive full AP weight for the course. Otherwise, Honors weight will apply.